January 14, 2016

New York Build Show connects with Greg Patterson, President, Technicraft Product Design Inc. and co-inventor of Shutgun – to talk about the risks and benefits of automated sprinklers on a construction site.

Q) What are the risks of having an automated sprinkler on a construction site?

A) Accidents can occur on any construction site, especially when heavy equipment and machinery is being operated. In caseswhere a sprinkler head is accidently activated, the water damage can run into the tens of thousands of dollars. They also risk insurance costs, project delays and other losses. The fear of these accidents has resulted in some contractors delaying the install of automated sprinkler systems, which puts their employees and the building at risk.

Q) I can see why there is a dilemma, is there any other alternative?

A) I believe that companies should employ proper risk management from the very beginning. The best way to do this is to install automatic sprinklers on every site and have a Shutgun sprinkler shut off tool on each floor in case of accidental discharge.

Q) How does the Shutgun work to counteract the impact of water damage on a construction site?

A) The Shutgun system is equipped with a one handed squeeze mechanism that shuts off the water supply in seconds. It also has a unique fusible link allowing it to be left in place with the sprinkler system charged until the head can be replaced. The link is designed to automatically release the tool in the event of a fire or re-ignition – thus giving the building full fire protection despite the activation. It’s peace of mind for the project manager.

Q) What do you recommend for the Construction industry?

Construction Managers should also be sure to have a Sheared Head Attachment for their Shutgun on site, in the case where a sprinkler head may have been accidently broken or sheared off completely. This is a common occurrence where ladders or heavy equipment are being used. This attachment is simply placed on the bottom jaw of the Shutgun, allowing it to hook over the top of the broken sprinkler head and stop the water flow with a one handed squeeze.